NATIONAL WORKAHOLICS DAY

July 5 is known as National Workaholics Day. For the past few years, This day has been celebrated for almost past few years. It’s true that this date isn’t an official holiday, but it is a sober reminder to all the workaholics to institute work-life balance in their lives.

Work ethic has changed many times over the centuries. During the sixteenth century, Puritans redefined work as an obligation that benefited everyone in society and the idea of “good works” was formed. They viewed diligent work as a sign of grace, while Catholics saw work as a requirement and a manifestation of the faith they received.

In 1968, comedian Roger Dangerfield came up with the word “workaholics” when he described his father and his relationship with alcohol to cope with the burdens of work. Nowadays, many people still have an unhealthy work-life, and National Workaholics Day is used to remedy that. According to him, it can be described as an uncontrollable need to work incessantly. It’s dedicated to people who work extra and long hours and keep doing it all the time, the holiday reminds them to enjoy summer weather elsewhere.

Like any addiction, workaholism can damage our lives, health, and eventually, productivity. Workaholism, however, is socially acceptable and in many office scenarios, is even admired and encouraged. The National Workaholics Day is to highlight the importance of unplugging and taking a break, which is so important.

Here are signs that may help identify if you are a hard worker or workaholic:

  • Do you take work with you to bed, on weekends or on vacation?
  • Do you think it’s alright to work long hours if you love what you do?
  • Is work, the activity, you do best and talk about the most?


Well, if you consider yourself as a workaholic, today is the perfect opportunity to celebrate, relax, take an afternoon nap, read a book in the park, go for a walk, hike or swim, watch a movie, or just relax and do nothing for one day. 🙂

Regards,
Khato Z

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